YNLC Project March 2018

    Students and fluent speakers gathered at the Yukon Native Language Centre for a Structure and Grammar Course on Athabaskan and Tlingit languages in early March, 2018.
     
    During this time YNLC and NNBY / CHON-FM recorded 6 Yukon First Nation languages represented in one place at one time. Video and audio recordings were made of the fluent speakers that were on site to contribute to the ongoing efforts of documentation and revitalization of Yukon Native languages through media promotion, resource development and access.

    Here are a couple of excerpts of this wonderful gathering.

    Professor James Crippen from the Simon Fraser University in BC with his story in Tligit of "The Raven and the Deer..." He provides an amazing demonstration of how this story was traditionally used to teach grammar and the structure of languages.. please click here for the video.

    Mable Henry, a Han-Gwitchin teacher from Dawson City area originally tells us a story called "The Bear" which was co-written with Allison Anderson to teach children and students the Han-Gwitchin language.. please click here for The Bear story

    Mable Henry also gives a wonderful demonstration of a day-by-day phone conversation which she reads from an illustrated booklet used to teach. please click here to watch the "Telephone Conversation"

    Bessie Cooley (Kèyishí)  tells us in her Tlingit language about the importance of education and what she learned and experienced.  Bessie speaks about her journey through school and university to achieve a degree. please click here for her "School is Important" segment

    Leda Jules - speaks in Kaska and she is from the Wolf Clan. She is originally lived in Ross River, Pelly Lakes, to Pelly Banks, and has been all over. Now she lives in Watson Lake, where her children go to school. 

    Here is here story about her parents in Kaska.

    "When I was just a little baby, my mother passed away. Her name was Īda. My dad’s name was Sā Dę́ʼ, which means Sun Ray. His English name was Paul Charlie. My grandmother’s name was Dzedehʼīnīmā - The One Who Foresees the Future. She was named by my great grandfather Old Maje. My great grandfather was a powerful medicine man and she was his daughter. She married grandpa Kes’ṓlī when she was young and they had lots of children. They left us long time ago, and now, we are living without them. I received my grandmother’s Dene name, Dzedehʼīnīmā - The One Who Foresees the Future. Before we went to school we were always travelling around. Our grandparents set traps and that is how we survived. When we were small, my little brothers and I, we used to run around with little snowshoes our grandparents made for us. Back then, we lived a really good life, nobody got sick. I donʼt know what is happening now, so many people are getting sick and passing on. That is why I feel so lonely, because we donʼt have any elders left.

    We came here, so we could speak our language, and that is why we are here. My younger brother and I, we talk to the younger people here in our language, so they too can speak. Not too many elders speak the language now, and that is why we are doing this. We are doing it so the younger people could talk like us." .. please watch her video here!

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